Bangor University

Living in the dark: Impact of winter warming on ecosystem stability in the terrestrial high Arctic

The high Arctic is warming at an alarming rate, disrupting soil carbon, nutrient and hydrological cycles. This is resulting in increased soil microbial activity with subsequent increases in nutrient availability and hence plant productivity and nutrient losses to the wider environment. Losses of the greenhouse gases, nitrous oxide, methane and carbon dioxide result in a […]

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Dispersal of microplastics in the marine environment

With an estimated 8 million tonnes of plastic entering our oceans each year, marine plastics are one of the biggest and most immediate threats facing the marine environment. Over 90% of marine plastics are classed as microplastics (particle sizes less than 5 mm), resulting from the degradation of larger plastics (diffuse sources), and directly input […]

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Long distance drone tracking of key pollinators in agricultural and natural landscapes

Long distance drone tracking of key pollinators in agricultural and natural landscapes

Many plant species, including numerous agricultural ones, depend on pollinator services; yet agricultural intensification and urbanisation have caused habitat loss and fragmentation, leading to substantial declines of some pollinators. Any forecasts, risk assessments and remedies thus hinge crucially on understanding how pollinators use space; however, most studies of pollinator spatial movements have taken place over […]

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Species4Services – Which Species and Traits Best Indicate Ecosystem Services?

Species4Services – Which Species and Traits Best Indicate Ecosystem Services?

*******Application deadline – Friday 29th June 2018******* Background: Ecosystem services (ES; the goods humans get from nature) such as crop production, carbon capture and livestock grazing are produced by complex interactions among biological species, human activities and the abiotic environment. Primary data characterising ES are rare and the biological component is poorly understood. Thus, ES […]

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Devil rays get worldwide protection, and genetic tools could catch out illegal traders

Jane Hosegood 400 x 400 px

Jane Hosegood, an Envision DTP student in her 3rd year at Bangor University is studying ‘Novel genetic tools for conservation and management of vulnerable manta rays’. Read her article on NERC Planet Earth to find out how she has been involved in getting worldwide protection for the devil rays she is studying: http://www.nerc.ac.uk/planetearth/stories/1857.

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