2018

Effects of electromagnetic noise on the orientation of migratory birds

Effects of electromagnetic noise on the orientation of migratory birds

Animals face many challenges as increased urbanization impacts their ability to survive and reproduce. Nowhere is this more evident than in migratory birds. Throughout Europe evidence indicates that populations of migratory birds are declining. Many anthropogenic influences are implicated, such as land use and climate change. However, recently, a new and surprising potential hazard to bird migration has emerged. […]

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Using western boundary currents to generate electricity: resource characterisation, technical & practical constraints

Using western boundary currents to generate electricity: resource characterisation, technical & practical constraints

To reduce our reliance on fossil fuels, it is crucial that we continue to explore renewable energy resources and technologies. It is possible to convert the kinetic energy that resides in ocean currents into electricity by installing arrays of turbines, and the global potential of this energy resource is vast. In contrast to (twice daily) tides that are characterized […]

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Quantifying the effects of deer on woodland structure in a human-altered landscape

Quantifying the effects of deer on woodland structure in a human-altered landscape

The last century has seen a rapid increase in populations of deer species across Europe due to altered land use, improved wildlife management, reduced predation and more favourable climatic conditions. High deer densities have the potential to restructure vegetation, reduce woodland productivity and impact biodiversity. Sustainable management of these species is therefore crucial, but it relies on a detailed understanding […]

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Pushing the limits: Life in extreme desert environments

Pushing the limits: Life in extreme desert environments

Hyper-arid hot deserts experience some of the most severe climatic conditions on Earth, and are often used to understand the potential for life on exoplanets such as Mars. In addition, studying the biology in these environments helps us to understand how ecosystems will respond to future climate change (e.g. extreme drought events). This project aims to define the critical […]

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Living with human disturbance: conservation physiology of a wild African primate

Living with human disturbance: conservation physiology of a wild African primate

In a world of increasing anthropogenic influence, understanding how rare and specialised species adapt to human-modified landscapes is essential for conservation. Primates face many threats including direct pressure from hunting, human-wildlife conflict and loss of habitat. Increasingly, the new field of conservation physiology is recognising that such threats can also have indirect role through their effect on metabolic markers […]

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The greening of the Arctic Ocean: Are increased nutrient fluxes responsible?

The greening of the Arctic Ocean: Are increased nutrient fluxes responsible?

This exciting project, which is jointly supervised by scientists from the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool and Bangor University, focuses on a key question in Climate Change Science; i.e. is the greening of the Arctic Ocean, which is being observed as sea ice retreats, a result of increased mixing up of nutrients from depth? To the answer this question the […]

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Reconstructing 2000 years of hydrological change in Africa – implications for future climate scenarios

Reconstructing 2000 years of hydrological change in Africa – implications for future climate scenarios

Lake systems in Africa provide drinking water to some of Earth’s fastest growing and most vulnerable human populations. In response to climatic and anthropogenic pressure, such as land-use changes, lakes are under threat from changes in water balance and water quality. There is an urgent need for regional climate information from tropical regions to allow the downscaling of climate […]

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Quantification of the dermal absorption of organic soil contaminants present for human health risk assessment of post-industrial brownfield land

Quantification of the dermal absorption of organic soil contaminants present for human health risk assessment of post-industrial brownfield land

This CASE PhD studentship is a unique opportunity to make significant advances in the field of organic geochemistry and risk-based land management of post-industrial brownfield land. Your research will supervised by a team of globally acknowledged thought leaders from the University of Nottingham (Prof. Paul Nathanail), British Geological Survey (Dr. Christopher Vane) and WSP (Prof. […]

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